Blogs

Five Common Misconceptions about Thermal Design

Chris Aldham, Product Manager
6SigmaET/6sigmaet.info

Small, powerful, compact devices have always been at the heart of the electronics industry. But, with the constant demand for shrinking devices comes increased power densities and a lot more heat being generated in ever-decreasing spaces. The smaller the devices get, the more heat-conscious engineers need to be. Continue reading

Fanless Thermal Solution Design Guide for IoT Applications

Mike Schroeder – Intel Corp IoT Thermal Mechanical Systems Eng.
Jacob Fritsch – Intel Corp IoT Thermal Mechanical Systems Eng.
Erich Ewy – Intel Corp IoT Thermal Mechanical Systems Mgr.

The internet of things (IoT) network of interconnected devices is driving an explosion of integrated-electronic components (IC) for embedded applications. Compute and wireless systems and sensors will be deployed at the IoT edge, where environmental considerations have challenging implications for thermal and mechanical design. In order to function reliably in harsh environments with extended operating ambient temperature ranges, electronics housings for IoT solutions that support low-power components with fan-less designs in sealed enclosures will be desirable. This paper is intended to be a practical guide for the thermal designer to quickly size and implement an optimized fanless thermal solution that is feasible for high volume manufacturing. Continue reading

Cooling Towers Offer Water and Energy Savings as Part of Efficient Data Center Cooling Systems

Douglas Bougher and Kent Martens, P.E.
SPX Cooling Technologies, Inc.

The number of data centers in the United States continues to grow in response to the enormous amount of digital information stored and streamed. The massive computer power within these data centers generates heat, making efficient cooling a key building system requirement. Evaporative cooling towers are an integral part of many data center cooling systems. Continue reading

Using Thermal Simulation to Design a Better Outdoor Electronic Product

Nitesh Kumar Sardana, Thermal Management of Electronics Group
Robert Bosch Engineering and Business Solution Pvt. Ltd., Bengaluru, India

Electronic products operate in varied thermal environments. Their operation is challenged when the size of the housing is reduced and when the product is mounted in an open environment exposed to climatic conditions. Solar radiation increases the temperature difference of the product’s internal air from the ambient by 150 to 300 percent. Continue reading

2 oz, or Not 2 oz: That is the Question?

Dr Giles Humpston, Applications Manager
Cambridge Nanotherm 

A variation of this question vexed Prince Hamlet while the modern version unsettles many a LED PCB designer. It’s all about copper thickness. When designing a PCB for LEDs, what weight of copper should be specified? Continue reading

Adiabatic Technology Helps Cooling Keep Pace with Data Center Growth

Adam Meyer, Sales Manager
Technical Systems, Inc.

Every year, the amount of electronic data that companies process and store grows exponentially. Data centers cannot economically increase the physical space available to keep pace with the growth, and are now challenged to provide more computer power in the same amount of space. The higher levels of microprocessing power in the same physical footprint increases heat density, so owners need more efficient cooling systems that will keep up with the market need without breaking the bank. One technology receiving attention is adiabatic cooling, which uses up to 90 percent less water than other systems. Continue reading

Smart Electronic Adhesives for Microelectronics – Enabled by Low Viscosity Nanocomposite Materials

Dr. Andreas Funck, Head of AT Electronics, Evonik Nutrition & Care GmbH
Torsten Lubenow, AT Electronics, Evonik Nutrition & Care GmbH

Abstract
Epoxy resins commonly used for the encapsulation of electronic materials are often filled with various inorganic materials to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), improve thermal conductivity and feature other  mechanical properties. The increase in viscosity that accompanies the increase in filler loading, limits the amount of filler that can be added to a liquid encapsulation system. As a result, highly filled systems are difficult to use in applications that require better flow characteristics such as, flip chip under-fills, transfer molding masses and encapsulates. Moreover, trends of miniaturization require encapsulation systems with much lower viscosity, but with more efficient thermal management. Continue reading