Articles

Using Thermal Simulation to Design a Better Outdoor Electronic Product

Nitesh Kumar Sardana, Thermal Management of Electronics Group
Robert Bosch Engineering and Business Solution Pvt. Ltd., Bengaluru, India

Electronic products operate in varied thermal environments. Their operation is challenged when the size of the housing is reduced and when the product is mounted in an open environment exposed to climatic conditions. Solar radiation increases the temperature difference of the product’s internal air from the ambient by 150 to 300 percent. Continue reading

2 oz, or Not 2 oz: That is the Question?

Dr Giles Humpston, Applications Manager
Cambridge Nanotherm 

A variation of this question vexed Prince Hamlet while the modern version unsettles many a LED PCB designer. It’s all about copper thickness. When designing a PCB for LEDs, what weight of copper should be specified? Continue reading

Adiabatic Technology Helps Cooling Keep Pace with Data Center Growth

Adam Meyer, Sales Manager
Technical Systems, Inc.

Every year, the amount of electronic data that companies process and store grows exponentially. Data centers cannot economically increase the physical space available to keep pace with the growth, and are now challenged to provide more computer power in the same amount of space. The higher levels of microprocessing power in the same physical footprint increases heat density, so owners need more efficient cooling systems that will keep up with the market need without breaking the bank. One technology receiving attention is adiabatic cooling, which uses up to 90 percent less water than other systems. Continue reading

Smart Electronic Adhesives for Microelectronics – Enabled by Low Viscosity Nanocomposite Materials

Dr. Andreas Funck, Head of AT Electronics, Evonik Nutrition & Care GmbH
Torsten Lubenow, AT Electronics, Evonik Nutrition & Care GmbH

Abstract
Epoxy resins commonly used for the encapsulation of electronic materials are often filled with various inorganic materials to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), improve thermal conductivity and feature other  mechanical properties. The increase in viscosity that accompanies the increase in filler loading, limits the amount of filler that can be added to a liquid encapsulation system. As a result, highly filled systems are difficult to use in applications that require better flow characteristics such as, flip chip under-fills, transfer molding masses and encapsulates. Moreover, trends of miniaturization require encapsulation systems with much lower viscosity, but with more efficient thermal management. Continue reading

Taking Full Advantage of Computational Fluid Dynamics in Electrical and Thermal Energy Technology Innovation

Kuninori Masushige and Yuka Takahashi
Siemens PLM Software, Japan

Seasoned engineers from the Thermal System Technology Department in the Application Technology Research Center at Fuji Electric Co., Ltd. (Fuji Electric) are applying computer-aided engineering (CAE) to the performance reviews and design development technology of various products developed by the company. In this article, Fuji Electric simulation experts Tsutomu Yamamoto, Yoshiaki Enami, and Kimihisa Kaneko discuss how they apply CFD. Continue reading

LEDs Under the Thumb

Dr Giles Humpston, Applications Manager
Cambridge Nanotherm 

LEDs do two things really well. They emit light and heat, in roughly equal measures. The light is generally useful, the heat less so. Heat and LEDs do not make good bedfellows so when designing a solidstate light source, as much care needs to be taken in removing the heat as managing the photons. Continue reading

Coupled Thermal-Electrical Simulations Shed Light on LED Performance

Pier Angelo Favarolo and Lukas Osl – Zumtobel Group
Sabine Goodwin and Ruben Bons – Siemens PLM Software

Light Emitting Diode (LED) manufacturers sort their products into “bins” based on forward voltage, with the purpose of delivering the most consistent light possible. Despite the tight grouping of forward voltages in these bins, manufacturing tolerances continue to lead to significant variations in both current draw and temperatures inside the LEDs, resulting in a range of colors, even within the same batch. Continue reading